• Wed, July 31, 2019 1:49 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)
  • Thu, June 20, 2019 12:21 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)


  • Thu, May 30, 2019 12:00 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)
    Follow up editorial to The Herald from Mark Nix, Executive Director of the HBA of SC
    HBASC 
    After reading the recent article "Taxes from most York County homes don’t cover service costs. Who gets the tab?" I was left wondering why we build houses at all if houses create such a financial burden? The short answer is that when we look solely at the property tax revenue of a home, we are looking at only the smallest fraction of the income generated by that home. Such a simplistic view fails to take into consideration the jobs generated in the building of new homes (as many as 359 local jobs for every 100 single-family homes built in York County), the taxes and other revenue for local governments (up to $3 million annually for every 100 single-family homes built in York County), not to mention up to $25.3 million in local income. The residents of these new homes are the people in the community who pay taxes, fees, and shop at nearby stores and businesses—filling those new driveways with cars and those new homes with furniture and groceries. 

    Additionally, homebuilders shoulder the cost of local improvements such as roads, sewer, sidewalks, etc. and these improvements are then donated to the local government at no cost and in fact pay thousands of dollars in fees for the privilege (ie. Tap fees). Simply put, new construction and the residents of York County pay not only for the services they require from local government, but provide a surplus of millions of dollars in taxes, fees, and improved infrastructure. Housing economic impact analyses are routinely conducted (full reports can be found at hbaofsc.com) and the results are intended to answer the question of whether or not, from the standpoint of local governments in the area, residential development pays for itself. 

    Many lead articles in the local press have centered on discussing and voting for increased impact fees, moratoria, inclusionary zoning and other anti- growth measures. The misguided mantra that residential housing does not pay for itself is starting to grow louder and more persistent, but does not have a basis in fact. Economic studies by state and national economists and universities highlight the ongoing financial benefits of housing. In a time where “nearly a third of U.S. households (38.1 million) paid more than 30% of their incomes for housing” (based on a Harvard University study in 2016), our efforts should focus on ensuring that the hardworking members of our community—our law enforcement officers, our teachers, our fire fighters—can afford to live in the communities they so faithfully serve. 


  • Thu, May 23, 2019 1:28 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)
  • Fri, April 19, 2019 9:35 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)
  • Mon, March 25, 2019 12:11 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)
  • Wed, January 16, 2019 2:59 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)
  • Thu, January 03, 2019 6:04 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)

    January 2018 - December 2018 Spartanburg County Permits Report


    Jan County Permits Report.pdf

  • Wed, December 26, 2018 4:36 PM | Mary Speed Lynch (Administrator)


 

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